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Millennial Dads and DIY

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JayM
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Re: Millennial Dads and DIY

#11

Post by JayM » Sun Jun 09, 2019 9:25 pm

I'm a baby boomer and even to me this sounds like a typical old person's rant about how "Kids these days are so lazy. Why, back in my day we would..." in the snow, uphill, both directions.

Things back then were more simple in design and were able to be repaired. A lay-person could figure out how they worked just by tinkering with them. Now so many things are modularized and computerized and part of the Internet of Things. You can't figure them out without having access to technical documentation which is unavailable unless you're an Authorized Service Center. So yes, you have to pay someone else to fix them for you.

We had more free time than many millennials do now. In the US at least, years of union-busting, the gig economy, and other things have caused the 40 hour workweek to be almost extinct. Either you're forced to work 12 to 14 hour days, or you don't get enough hours so you're forced to take a second job just to make ends meet and pay down some debt, and if you have weekends off you're likely out delivering pizzas or driving for Uber for some extra cash. Who has time to take apart the blender and try to fix it? Just drop it off at the service center when you have the chance, or buy a new one.

We owned our own homes, with garages and shops and workbenches. We had places available to work on things in, and places to store tools and spare parts. Millennials are likely to be renting a small apartment/flat and sharing it with several roommates because the cost of housing is so high unless you live someplace where there are no jobs.
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jj1j1
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Re: Millennial Dads and DIY

#12

Post by jj1j1 » Sun Jun 09, 2019 9:35 pm

One thing that I disagree with today are the way polls are used. Take the polling data to compare millennial dads to baby boomers for instance. Where lies the truth of the resulting data? Concerning the data; can it or should it be refuted? Can 2000 dads create a fact? To me polls are nothing more than conversation pieces with no real basis in fact unless you want to take the word of those who took part in the poll. I'm not trying to make this political, but a perfect example is the 2016 presidential election, and all the polls that had determined Hillery would win...
I didn't have a dad that showed me much, but when I was a kid I had an inclination for everything mechanical, so diy stuff seems like a natural progression of that inclination. I like the fact that I can hop onto YouTube and find out how to do something like change a shock, or clean an injector. I look at it as just another tool in my chest. Seeing it done is the biggest help for me. That and knowing what tools I need, which sometimes is the reason why I can't do a repair. Never-the-less, I think it's an invaluable source of information for the mechanically inclined who desire, or choose to do whatever themselves.
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tascoast
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Re: Millennial Dads and DIY

#13

Post by tascoast » Sun Jun 09, 2019 10:15 pm

"But not these guys. A pair of pliers, a bit of wire and an axe will get them out of most situations."

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-04/ ... ry/7561464

Fencing wire and a pair of pliers are the traditional toolkit of the bush in Australia and part of folklore and our language. What these guys do is very much a make do and make it go in that tradition. I imagine much of the world still practices similar creativity and ingenuity where resources are limited.
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Re: Millennial Dads and DIY

#14

Post by asqwerth » Mon Jun 10, 2019 12:41 am

Cars - not interested in maintaining or repairing them myself. Always sent them to the car workshop.

Simple DIY around the home, sure. When appliances were more electrical than electronic, I would not have minded opening things up to have a look inside if I thought it was likely something I could sort out myself.

When I used to have more time, I even made myself a few Irish whistles from PVC pipe as well, just to see if I could do it with very manual hand tools (I don't have a full kit of power tools). They were pretty rough but worked fairly well except for the last 2 or 3 high notes, which were a little flat unless you blew really hard.

Nowadays though, I can't really be bothered. I think I'm sufficiently tech/mechanically-minded; I just don't want to do it.
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Re: Millennial Dads and DIY

#15

Post by bigbenaugust » Mon Jun 10, 2019 2:00 pm

Our house is a fixer-upper, and we have a family, I don't get a choice. :)

That said, having done a little of the work on the addition, most of the work on one bathroom, all of the work on the other, and all of the work on the kitchen has been amazing. But then, I also do my own bicycle repair.
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KBD
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Re: Millennial Dads and DIY

#16

Post by KBD » Mon Jun 10, 2019 3:35 pm

tascoast wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2019 10:15 pm
"But not these guys. A pair of pliers, a bit of wire and an axe will get them out of most situations."

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-04/ ... ry/7561464

Fencing wire and a pair of pliers are the traditional toolkit of the bush in Australia and part of folklore and our language. What these guys do is very much a make do and make it go in that tradition. I imagine much of the world still practices similar creativity and ingenuity where resources are limited.
That's awesome. Those guys need to know how to fix things :)

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KBD
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Re: Millennial Dads and DIY

#17

Post by KBD » Mon Jun 10, 2019 3:41 pm

JayM wrote:
Sun Jun 09, 2019 9:25 pm
I'm a baby boomer and even to me this sounds like a typical old person's rant about how "Kids these days are so lazy. Why, back in my day we would..." in the snow, uphill, both directions.
I don't think they are lazy. My kid is a millennial and she worked her ass off and has a Master's degree, a home, and a 10 month old girl, and great husband.
Problem is boomers and early gen-xers were helicopter parents and did too much basic stuff so these kids could focus on education but some of them missed out simple things like repairs and common sense stuff IMO.

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jj1j1
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Re: Millennial Dads and DIY

#18

Post by jj1j1 » Mon Jun 10, 2019 8:46 pm

I don't think they are lazy either. Too many variables can be involved in the acts of a person to make generalizations like polls do.
True freedom is never asking the question; Am I free?

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