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Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

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jj1j1
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Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#1

Post by jj1j1 » Fri Jul 05, 2019 4:43 pm

I've been using Linux for about three years off and on, and about a year exclusively for daily tasks, (email, using/surfing internet). I want to call myself a Linux user, but in many respects I feel I'm still a noob, and will be for some time. Although I use Linux on daily basis I'm waiting for that day I go from, noob, to Linux user. I know everyone uses Linux, or any OS for that matter, for different reasons. and after thinking about it, I wonder what others use or have used as a set of qualifiers to represent that jump. Is it successfully compiling a program from source files (This is what I've thought for some time.), or maybe learning, and successfully applying scripts?
True freedom is never asking the question; Am I free?

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Eadwine Rose
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#2

Post by Eadwine Rose » Fri Jul 05, 2019 4:54 pm

I am still trying to find the ramp to jump from..... :rofl:
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rasat
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#3

Post by rasat » Fri Jul 05, 2019 5:28 pm

jj1j1 wrote:
Fri Jul 05, 2019 4:43 pm
I've been using Linux for about three years off and on, and about a year exclusively for daily tasks, (email, using/surfing internet).
Your time-frame tells that you are a Linux User. Its not so much about technicality but the acceptance of using Linux. I knew everything about Linux until systemd made me a "newbie". But still I am a Linux User. Main difference, after the jump, you don't need to explain yourselves (to Windows or other users).

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m_pav
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#4

Post by m_pav » Fri Jul 05, 2019 5:44 pm

In as much as you are a car driver the moment you get into a car and drive it, you are a Linux user as soon as you start knowingly using it. The point of difference you re looking for is, at what time do you become so learned that you can lead others?

That is entirely dependant on your own abilities and willingness. Application use is the point that most common folk would attribute to "one who knows", though many of our most common apps have already been used by Windows users for some time, so that negates any semblance of "capable of IT support", which is potentially the point you're trying to reach. The question, therefore, must be broken up into smaller steps, the first of which is knowing your way around a system and being able to instruct others.

If you're comfortable installing Linux on almost any hardware type, including dual/multi-boot with Windows/other, and potentially working your way through some of the niggles like non-functioning drivers/services, then you are well on your way. To get this far, one must be aware of the pitfalls and best practices to ensure trouble-free utilisation of said system post modification, and at the very least, understand enough of the Linux file system and provisioned utilities to make it work. A proviso here though. Computer hardware and software are fast-moving targets, so you can never really be complacent in your knowledge and ability.

My response is barely sufficient to touch even the start of the question you have asked and is biased towards what I deem to be the entry level of support. Others may have a different point of view. If there's one thing you can take away from this, it's your ability to assist others with what you already know.

Taking my own journey as an example, I first encountered Linux in the late 90's and it really p'd me off because I was a Windows tech and it got in the way of my searches for device drivers. Then in 2001, I experienced my first live-CD and started using Linux in January 2002 on my daily driver. I joined a Linux Users Group late 2003 so I could learn more about Linux and took over as the lead presenter and club president only 5 months later and held that role for the next 5 years.
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jj1j1
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#5

Post by jj1j1 » Fri Jul 05, 2019 6:41 pm

I am still trying to find the ramp to jump from..... :rofl:
Hehehe. That's funny, but many of your past comments suggest otherwise. You don't strike me as a noob in the least.
True freedom is never asking the question; Am I free?

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manyroads
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#6

Post by manyroads » Fri Jul 05, 2019 7:16 pm

I'd say don't worry about it. You are you (and that's a really good thing). :number1:
Help those who need help, when you are able... you will learn. Ask for help when you need it... you will learn.
It's really about the learning, labels are for others to worry about. :bagoverhead:
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KBD
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#7

Post by KBD » Fri Jul 05, 2019 7:21 pm

Newbie: You are constantly breaking your setup.

Linux User: You only occasionally break your setup.

Expert: You never break your setup, or can quickly fix it if you do. (Either that or you are using MX Linux).

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JayM
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#8

Post by JayM » Fri Jul 05, 2019 8:50 pm

KBD wrote:
Fri Jul 05, 2019 7:21 pm
Newbie: You are constantly breaking your setup.
and have absolutely no idea how to go about fixing it.
Linux User: You only occasionally break your setup.
and have a pretty good idea what's wrong and what you need to do to fix it.
Expert: You never break your setup, or can quickly fix it if you do. (Either that or you are using MX Linux).
and you have a second setup that you're constantly breaking because that's the one you test things on and try new ideas.

Many years ago I read a post in Usenet, in a sysadmin's hangout newsgroup (the scary devil monastery.) I can't remember what the thread was about, but one guy posted about being called by a friend whose Linux had seemingly locked up or crashed while running a Very Important Process that couldn't be interrupted yet that process appeared to still be running so the computer couldn't be rebooted. The guy came over, had a look, was able to get into the computer through some means (perhaps via a terminal emulator on his laptop and a serial connection), identify and fix the problem and restart the bits of Linux that had quit working, through various highly technical means which he detailed in his post (which I am unable to find any more.) That's what I'd call an expert and then some.
Please read How To Ask For Help and How to Break Your System.
MX User Manual: hold down ALT and press F1. Further information may be found in the MX Wiki.

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JayM
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#9

Post by JayM » Fri Jul 05, 2019 8:58 pm

manyroads wrote:
Fri Jul 05, 2019 7:16 pm
I'd say don't worry about it. You are you (and that's a really good thing). :number1:
Help those who need help, when you are able... you will learn. Ask for help when you need it... you will learn.
It's really about the learning, labels are for others to worry about. :bagoverhead:
The day you stop learning is the day you've died.

I still consider myself a Linux newbie in many ways: there are a lot of questions that others ask or problems that they have that I won't even attempt to try to answer because I haven't a clue. I just try to help where I'm able, or at least ask the questions and request the information that I think others will want later on when they come online. I'm still learning things about Linux and suspect that I always will be.
Please read How To Ask For Help and How to Break Your System.
MX User Manual: hold down ALT and press F1. Further information may be found in the MX Wiki.

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jj1j1
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#10

Post by jj1j1 » Sat Jul 06, 2019 2:53 am

I visited github concerning Freecad because the version in MXPI is 3 years old, (v0.16), and latest version is 0.18.2. https://github.com/FreeCAD/FreeCAD/releases
I always feel extra noobish when I visit github. I have no idea about the site, or the terminology it uses. I've been meaning to sit down, and learn how to use the site. Just haven't done it yet. It was my last visit there which prompted my question. I think that if I learned, and understood how to use github I would be much the wiser.
True freedom is never asking the question; Am I free?

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