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Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

rasat
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#11

Post by rasat » Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:26 am

What have already said by others, Linux User is about learning and helping others. There is also contribution. The founder of Arch Linux, pointed it nicely:

"The great thing about contributions is that you don't need anyone's permission to make them. No one can physically stop you from writing something that you (personally) find useful, even if the "powers that be" don't see it as a blessing. Write it and put it up in the User Contributions forum. If other people like it, you will receive feedback. If virtually everyone out there hates it but you, who cares? It took you 20 minutes to write, and you learned something along the way, and now you can convert slack packages. It's a winning situation no matter what". (Judd Vinet)

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mxer
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#12

Post by mxer » Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:06 am

The difference, I think, is knowing where to look for help, when you have a problem, & can then fix it. :cool:
(FOSS, Linux, & BSD since 1999)

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Head_on_a_Stick
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#13

Post by Head_on_a_Stick » Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:59 am

Any GNU/Linux user who doesn't consider themselves a n00b is clearly suffering from the Dunning-Kruger effect.

Or to quote Thomas Sowell:
It takes considerable knowledge just to realize the extent of your own ignorance.
To give an example: Linus Torvalds can't even install Debian[1] — what a n00b!
"Direct action is the logical, consistent method of anarchism." — Emma Goldman

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JayM
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#14

Post by JayM » Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:30 am

Head_on_a_Stick wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:59 am
Any GNU/Linux user who doesn't consider themselves a n00b is clearly suffering from the Dunning-Kruger effect.

Or to quote Thomas Sowell:
It takes considerable knowledge just to realize the extent of your own ignorance.
To give an example: Linus Torvalds can't even install Debian[1] — what a n00b!
Poor guy ends up having to support Friends and Family's® computers. I feel for him, I really do. Free pizza isn't worth that much anguish. And I don't blame him for not wanting to support multiple distros either.
Please read How To Ask For Help and How to Break Your System.
MX User Manual: hold down ALT and press F1. Further information may be found in the MX Wiki.

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Artim
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#15

Post by Artim » Sat Jul 06, 2019 8:15 am

I'm a "responsible noob." I search before I try anything new, and I'm still scared of technology in general, even though I think gadgets are cool. But I'm a Linux User because I'm a few years beyond my first steps into Linux from Windows.

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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#16

Post by skidoo » Sat Jul 06, 2019 12:46 pm

when I visit github. I have no idea about the site, or the terminology it uses. I've been meaning to sit down, and learn how to use the site. Just haven't done it yet. It was my last visit there which prompted my question. I think that if I learned, and understood how to use github I would be much the wiser.
Both at gitlab.com and github.com, after registering a free user account and visiting the link provided in the email verification message... immediately after login, onscreen "onboarding" instructions for a few predictably common tasks are provided; you really don't need to "read a lot of documentation, understand a lot of terminology" to get started.

Each new git{lab,hub}.com participant has likely registered a user account due to an immediate motivation to perform one of the following:

- create, or post a reply to an "issue ticket" associated with some existing project

Really doesn't require instruction, just bear in mind that some projects have chosen disable the "issues" feature (because the project accepts suggestions and bug reports via some other venue)

- create a new project

Onscreen instructions prompt you to fill in a project name and press enter. It's that simple. Next you will be prompted with an opportunity to "create a README" file, or a new textfile name-of-your-choice (these lead to a page displaying an embedded text editor) or you can follow the onscreen instructions describing howto upload files from your local machine ~~ via web browser, or by using git commands (onscreen step-by-step copypasta is provided)

- clone an existing project

Onscreen instructions invite you to clone a "sample" project (if you do so, after playing with it you can easily delete it) or to fill in the url of a project you wish to clone. As soon as (seconds, occasionally takes a full minute) the operation has created an owned-by-you copy of the remote project's files, you can begin editing them, or performing selected deletions, or adding new files via embedded text editor or via upload, or from your local machine via git commands. As a greenhorn, you are not expected to, required to, choose "from your local machine via git commands"... but a set of step-by-step git commands is presented onscreen, or is a click away within a helpfile if you care to do so.

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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#17

Post by sunrat » Sat Jul 06, 2019 8:26 pm

mxer wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:06 am
The difference, I think, is knowing where to look for help, when you have a problem, & can then fix it. :cool:
Spot on. Noobs are people who post a question in a forum before doing an internet search. Users know they might find a solution in minutes by searching, whereas a forum may take hours or days to come up with an answer.

I don't think anyone can truly be a "Linux expert". One may be an expert in Linux networking, or Linux database or whatever, but it's way too broad a field to be an expert in everything.

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jj1j1
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#18

Post by jj1j1 » Sat Jul 06, 2019 10:52 pm

It takes considerable knowledge just to realize the extent of your own ignorance.
I sort of adopted a saying similar to that many years ago. It goes; "The older I get the less I know". Don't remember where I heard it from, but if the day ever comes when I'm not sure of it's truth then I will know it's correct :confused: As far as being a noob I'll most likely always be one as long as I continue to stroll beyond my comfort zone.
Last edited by jj1j1 on Sun Jul 07, 2019 12:49 am, edited 3 times in total.
True freedom is never asking the question; Am I free?

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JayM
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#19

Post by JayM » Sun Jul 07, 2019 12:39 am

sunrat wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 8:26 pm
I don't think anyone can truly be a "Linux expert". One may be an expert in Linux networking, or Linux database or whatever, but it's way too broad a field to be an expert in everything.
True. Just look at Linus Torvalds in that video that was linked to earlier in the thread. He admitted that he knows nothing about IT and computer support and even has issues installing some distros, such as Debian, which I found pretty easy to do with Stretch in a VM, though installation is very slow compared to others. Though of course he was trying to install it on a Macbook Air. (I wish someone had asked him which distro he ended up installing on it and how difficult it was. He didn't even have fehlix's scripts.)
Please read How To Ask For Help and How to Break Your System.
MX User Manual: hold down ALT and press F1. Further information may be found in the MX Wiki.

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masterpeace
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Re: Defining the jump from noob to Linux User

#20

Post by masterpeace » Mon Jul 08, 2019 2:57 am

KBD wrote:
Fri Jul 05, 2019 7:21 pm
Newbie: You are constantly breaking your setup.
* i am a noob for about a month but MX and Manjaro i installed haven't break ... yet

Expert: You never break your setup, or can quickly fix it if you do. (Either that or you are using MX Linux).
* is using live medium to fix thing when the system break considered as expert ?
by that definition i am below a noob OTL

hopefully it won't last long

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